Art Detroit Now Newsletter – June 7, 2012

Art Detroit Now Newsletter – June 7, 2012

 


Your online guide to great contemporary art in Detroit. 
June 7, 2012 – News, exhibitions, openings and events.

Re:View Contemporary Gallery

 

 

Matt Zacharias:  Childhood, Boyhood & Sonic Youth    

In his first solo show at the gallery entitled Childhood, Boyhood, Sonic Youth, Matt Zacharias continues his ongoing preoccupation with the fertile period of coming of age through youth culture and personal narrative. By deconstructing and reconfiguring imagery of rock-stars, actors, and characters of childhood, Zacharias creates a frenetic visual style evoking a sense of ‘channel-surfing’ in the 2D. This array of fragmented flashes of memory and bittersweet humor provides a guided tour inside the emotional topography of Zacharias’ past.

Zacharias utilizes various media in this new body of work including found materials such as advertisements and images from vintage magazines, and personal ephemera such as rock posters and family photos, painting, screen-printing, collage, and constructed objects. The works in this show ask their viewer to examine the relationship to how mass media and the pressure of the idealized American experience affects the formation of identity.

Opening Saturday, June 9, 7-10pm.

Show runs through July 7.  

 

UMMA

 

Flip Your Field:  Abstract Art from the Collection  
This is the inaugural exhibition of a new series of exhibitions to be curated by UM faculty. Entitled Flip Your Field, this series asks these guest curators to consider artwork outside their field of specialization from UMMA’s renowned collections to challenge their own thinking as well as that of UMMA’s audiences. Celeste Brusati, Professor of History of Art, Women’s Studies, and Art and Design, an expert in the visual art and culture of the Netherlands from the fifteenth through the seventeenth centuries, has gathered a compelling group of images by such titans of twentieth-century abstraction as Lee Bontecou, Helen Frankenthaler, Wassily Kandinsky, Joan Miró, Robert Motherwell, and Antonio Tàpies, as well as works by many other unexpected artists.
 
Opening Saturday, June 9.


Show runs through September 2.

Judith Turner:  The Flatness of Ambiguity
Judith Turner is a noted American photographer whose subject matter is mostly architecture. Turner’s training as a designer allows her to visually understand an architect’s intention and to reveal it in compositions that she constructs and edits through her camera work. Her photography can be seen as a metalanguage of architectural intention and as an artistic expression that is inseparable from the representation of the built work. Turner’s signature style consists of highly abstract black-and-white compositions that play with the ambiguity of light, shadow, and tonality to heighten the aesthetic character of her subject matter and reveal visual relationships not readily apparent. This exhibition will present approximately forty photographs spanning Turner’s three-decade career.

Opening Saturday, June 9.

Show runs through September 2.

 

David Klein Gallery

    

Good For You   

Paintings, like poetry or music, are essential nutrients that help people sustain healthy lives. They’re not recreational pleasures or sidelines. They are tools that help us grasp the diversity of the world and its history, and explore the emotional capacities with which we navigate that world. They illuminate, they humble, they nurture, they inspire. They teach us to use our eyes and to know ourselves by knowing others. 

  

Kristin Beaver

Ben Grasso

Alyssa Monks

Jessica Rohrer

Trevor Young 

 

Opening Saturday, June 9, 6-8pm.  

Show runs through July 21.   

 

Butter Projects


Rising & Falling     

“Rising & Falling” is an exhibition of epic proportions; focusing on histories, the artist doubles as storyteller with visual narratives that contain compelling tales that span the ages. We invite you to travel through time, from ancient to present day with accounts both real and imagined.

Participating Artists:
John Charnota, William Connally, Matthew Craven, Elliott Earls, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Christopher Gideon, Aimee Lee, Tiffany Massey and Eric McDade.
Also including work from the private collection of Adrian Hatfield and from the showrooms of Orley Shabahang.
Opening Friday, June 8, 7-10pm.

Readings by Steve Hughes at 9pm.

 
Show runs through July 8.   

MoCAD

 

The Nationwide Museum Mascot

The Nationwide Museum Mascot Project (NWMMP) is a Los Angeles-based group of mascots and kind-hearted pranksters. Taking their cue from sports-team mascots, NWMMP promotes museums by surprising visitors, community and staff with crowd-pleasing antics, handshakes, high-fives, hugs and a host of other activities.

“In general, we feel that art museums are not always friendly places for people who are not already familiar with the culture and rhetoric. NWMMP seeks to bridge this gap, and in the process, pull down the institution’s pants a little,” says NWMMP co-founder Brian Dick. “Although we are often invited to mascot an institution, for the summer tour, we (NWMMP) just might take the liberty of inviting ourselves,” says co-founder Sperry-Garcia.   

 

*The Nation Wide Museum Mascot Project will also be running a workshop at the Hamtramck Public Library on Saturday, June 16.  

 

Runs June 11 through 18.  

 

 

N’NAMDI CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART  
  

 

Ménage à Detroit:  Second Generation Artist Talk

A multimedia exhibit in which 30 local, regional, and national artists explore Nature as a source of spirituality in contemporary life. There was a time in our early history when Nature had meaning far beyond

 

dirt, embedded minerals, stones, and vegetation.  It was thought to have qualities that were uplifting, transcendent, even divine. Today, our primary goals seem to be controlling and exploiting Nature, diminishing its significance in the spiritual realm.   Yet even amidst this harnessed and constrained vision of Nature, we sometimes acknowledge Nature’s grandeur and its capacity to hold ancient memories,  and contribute to our physical and spiritual well-being.  We designate hallowed ground, such as battlefields and cemeteries.  We revere places of great beauty, such as our national parks.  We also find hidden coves, sacred groves and plateaus used by ancient aboriginal or native humans as burial mounds and sites of ritual, celebration, and ceremony.  Each of us has special places we know where we have derived higher meaning through our  experience there.  These thin places often describe environments where we feel uplifted and part of something bigger than ourselves.  In this exhibit, artists have found ways to express that very highest form of appreciation of Nature discovered in their travels, work and play.

 

Opening Friday, June 8, 6-9pm.  

 

Show runs through July 15.  

 

CAVE


Trickle-Down Electronics      

A group exhibition of Rhode Island School of Design Digital and Media MFA graduates. 

Opening Friday, June 8, 7-10pm. 
 
Show runs through June 30..   

Funhouse Gallery

 

Poisoned Apples

In honor of the 75th anniversary of the animated film Snow White, a celebration like no other will take place at Funhouse Gallery Detroit.
More than 80 local, national and international contemporary artists will display their interpretations
of the story of The Original Princess. Opening reception guests will enjoy art, theme-inspired hors d’oeuvres & live performances by local favorites throughout the evening.

Expect everything from fine art technique oil paintings to street art-inspired works from the likes of Justin Aerni, Ryan Myers, Struggle Buggy, and Jason Rudolph Pena, as well as local favorites such as A. Owen Layne, DVS, Bridgett Davenport, Eve Noir, Marty Winters, and more.

Curated by Diane Irby.

Performances by Lula La Rose, Izgreyala, Meridith Lorde,

Lushes LaMoan, & Emily Infinity

 

Opening Saturday, June 9, 7-10pm.  

 

Show runs through June 23.    

    

 

 

GALLERY PROJECT 
  

 

Nature as Spirit

A multimedia exhibit in which 30 local, regional, and national artists explore Nature as a source of spirituality in contemporary life. There was a time in our early history when Nature had meaning far beyond

 

dirt, embedded minerals, stones, and vegetation.  It was thought to have qualities that were uplifting, transcendent, even divine. Today, our primary goals seem to be controlling and exploiting Nature, diminishing its significance in the spiritual realm.   Yet even amidst this harnessed and constrained vision of Nature, we sometimes acknowledge Nature’s grandeur and its capacity to hold ancient memories,  and contribute to our physical and spiritual well-being.  We designate hallowed ground, such as battlefields and cemeteries.  We revere places of great beauty, such as our national parks.  We also find hidden coves, sacred groves and plateaus used by ancient aboriginal or native humans as burial mounds and sites of ritual, celebration, and ceremony.  Each of us has special places we know where we have derived higher meaning through our  experience there.  These thin places often describe environments where we feel uplifted and part of something bigger than ourselves.  In this exhibit, artists have found ways to express that very highest form of appreciation of Nature discovered in their travels, work and play.

 

Opening Friday, June 8, 6-9pm.  

 

Show runs through July 15.  

 

PEWABIC POTTERY 

 

 

House & Garden Party 

 

Free and open to the public.  

 

Friday & Saturday & Sunday, 10am-5pm.
Sunday, 12-5pm.

 

RIVER GALLERY

 

 

River Gallery Outdoor Sculpture Event

 

During the 22nd annual Ann Arbor garden walk.  Please join us at garden #5, address available upon ticket purchase.  Featuring Brian Ferribly and guest sculptors artwork on display throughout gardens and grounds.  

To purchase tickets.

 

Saturday, June 9, 10-4pm.

 

ANTON ART CENTER  

 

 

Call for Entries: Aliment

 

Artists 18 and older are invited to enter the Anton Art Center’s food-themed exhibition, Aliment.  Works submitted must use food as subject matter, material or inspiration. 

Submissions due July 17, 2012.  

 

DETROIT CREATIVE CORRIDOR & VIRGIL H. CARR CULTURAL CENTER  

 

 

Drinks X Design 

 

Join us at the Virgil H. Carr Cultural Center as they launch their new brand identity!

Programming includes:

Three Art Exhibitions, the debut of the ArtsNOW Project 2012 (a CD created by Henry Ford High School Students), Special tours of the building by the Carr Center President,  light appetizers courtesy of COLORS and beverage courtesy of  Entwine Wine and Pabst Blue Ribbon.

When the 20 year old Arts League of Michigan (ALM) moved into its new home in July of 2009, it was a victory after a 4-year effort. The ALM no longer had to hold arts activities in scattered Metro Detroit venues-it had its own. The new home is a 19th century building formerly known as the Harmonie Club, in what is now, Paradise Valley. It was re-named the Virgil H. Carr Cultural Arts Center. At the heart of ALM are the arts classes for youngsters ages 7 to 18 in creative writing, dance, theater, photography and especially jazz and visual arts. They have been identifiers of the ALM community-focused arts mission since 1991. That recently expanded with the addition of arts classes for adults.

Virgil H. Carr Cultural Center Thursday, June 14, 5:30-7:30pm.

PV Lounge 6:30-8pm.  

 


 

 

|